Reports on international cooperation for climate change mitigation

Reports commissioned by the Swedish Energy Agency on international cooperation for climate change mitigation.

Environmental integrity and additionality in the new context of the Paris Agreement crediting mechanisms

Randall Spalding-Fecher & Francois Sammut (Carbon Limits), Derik Broekhoff (SEI-US Center) and Jürg Füssler (INFRAS)
February 2017

The major shift under the Paris Agreement versus the Kyoto Protocol is that all countries have pledges. Article 6 gives the possibility for Parties, on a voluntary basis, to cooperate on mitigation (and adaptation) towards achieving their NDCs.

The report explores two aspects; how environmental integrity could be ensured and what additionality and baselines means in the new context of the Paris agreement for activities undertaken under Article 6.2 and Article 6.4 respectively.

International Cooperation under the Paris Agreement - Exploring opportunities for Swedish cooperation with developing countries

Jelmer Hoogzaad, Adriaan Korthuis, Sandra Greiner, Morten Pedersen and Emelie Öhlander
June 2016

The success of the Paris Agreement to achieve its global mitigation ambition will hinge largely on the ability of countries to translate their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) into mitigation action. The report suggests opportunities for Swedish international cooperation on climate action to support the implementation of the Paris Agreement.

Net Mitigation through the CDM

Christiaan Vrolijk with Gareth Phillips
September 2013

With negotiations on a new climate regime underway, there is growing demand for increased contribution to climate change mitigation by all Parties, and calls for carbon market mechanisms, including the CDM, to deliver net mitigation beyond offsetting. With a review of the existing mechanisms underway, new approaches being developed under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and negotiations ongoing on a global climate regime from 2020 onwards, the contribution of the CDM to net mitigation has been topic of lively – and timely – debate. A variety of options is available for delivering net mitigation via the CDM. This report explores a total of thirteen, assessed against six criteria, such as ease of implementation, wide applicability and transparent and accurate accounting. In this report, we consider 'net mitigation' to mean that part of the reductions achieved by CDM projects are not used for offsetting Annex I emissions.

National policies and the CDM rules: options for the future

Randall Spalding-Fecher
September 2013

The question of how to consider national policies in baseline and additionality determination has been a controversial one since the early days of the CDM. As the climate regime evolves to include additional carbon market mechanisms and support for domestic action, this question becomes both more important and more complex because of the potential for interaction between different mechanisms and policy instruments. At the same time, the slow pace of negotiations on new mechanisms may open up more opportunity to push the boundaries of the CDM. The purpose of this paper is to explore options and provide recommendations on how the CDM rules and practices on national policies could be changed both to increase the transparency and the integrity of the CDM; to explore how national policies may be addressed in new mechanisms; and to address the potential interactions with new carbon market mechanisms and support programmes.