New statistics: Increased energy use for multi-dwelling buildings and non-residential premises, 2010

There was an increase in the energy used for heating multi-dwelling buildings and non-residential premises during 2010. This is apparent from new statistics published by the Swedish Energy Agency. A multi-dwelling building was found to use on average 158 kWh per square metre for heating and hot water.

A total of 29 terawatt hours (TWh) were used for heating and hot water in multi-dwelling buildings in 2010, which is an increase of 3 TWh compared with 2009. In non-residential premises, energy use increased from 18 TWh to a little more than 19 TWh over the same period.

"The increase is partly attributable to the fact that 2010 was a considerably colder year than 2009," says Lars Nilsson, Analyst at the Swedish Energy Agency.

On average, 11 500 kilowatt hours (kWh) were used for space heating and hot water in a dwelling in 2010. The energy use was 158 kWh per square metre in multi-dwelling buildings and 146 kWh per square metre in non-residential premises. This can be compared with 2009 when 10 900 kWh were used per dwelling, 148 kWh per square metre in multi-dwelling buildings and 135 kWh per square metre in non-residential premises.

District heating the predominant method for space heating

District heating is the predominant method for heating, and accounted for over 90 per cent of the energy used for space heating and hot water in multi-dwelling buildings. In the case of non-residential premises, district heating accounted for just over 80 per cent.

The use of oil continues to decrease for both multi-dwelling buildings as well as non-residential premises. During 2010, oil accounted for slightly over 1 per cent of the energy used for heating and hot water in multi-dwelling buildings.

About the statistics

The statistics are based on two sample surveys that address owners of multi-dwelling buildings and buildings that contain non-residential premises. The response frequency for the survey of multi-dwelling buildings was 63 per cent and for the survey of buildings containing non-residential premises, 64 per cent. The purpose of the statistics is to provide information on the method of heating used, on the energy used and on how the areas are used in the present stock of multi-dwelling buildings and non-residential premises. The statistics serve as a basis for, among other aspects, energy balances, national accounts and reporting to Eurostat. Both surveys have been conducted since 1977.

The statistics have been drawn up by Statisticon on behalf of the Swedish Energy Agency.